Tag Archives: Incident at the window

Detailed questions and answers on “Incident at the Window”

Comprehension questions

What does Enfield discover about Hyde’s rooms that he didn’t know? Why do you think Utterson hadn’t already told him this information?

What are Jekyll’s mood and emotions like in this chapter?

Analytical questions

How does Stevenson use description and dialogue to create a sense of drama and impending doom in this chapter?

Evaluative questions

How successful is this chapter in provoking the reader’s curiosity?

Creative response tasks

Write a poem or short story about a brief but chilling meeting with a friend who is in a bad way, calling it “My Sad Friend”.

Write Enfield’s diary for this chapter in which he talks about his friendship with Utterson and his thoughts on Jekyll and Hyde.

 

You can watch a YouTube video I made about this section here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDO-vorkfUc

 

POSSIBLE ANSWERS in brief & bold

 

Comprehension questions

What does Enfield discover about Hyde’s rooms that he didn’t know? He realises that Hyde’s living quarters are actually the back part of Dr Jekyll’s house.

Why do you think Utterson hadn’t already told him this information? Utterson is a very “discreet” person: he does not reveal his friend’s secrets or troubles to anyone. Thus we see him as someone who can be trusted and doesn’t gossip.

What are Jekyll’s mood and emotions like in this chapter? Jekyll is revealed as being in a state of “abject terror” when he finishes talking to Enfield and Utterson: he is terrified in the most extreme fashion.

 

Analytical questions

How does Stevenson use description and dialogue to create a sense of drama and impending doom in this chapter? The description of Jekyll sitting in such a dejected way at the window creates a sense of impending doom because we see that hhe feels that he has no future prospects. He appears to be without hope: he can’t even go out for a walk with his friends. Then when his mood shifts from one of depression to “abject terror” we have a sense that something terrible is going to happen to Jekyll.

 Evaluative questions

How successful is this chapter in provoking the reader’s curiosity? Stevenson’s manages to carry on creating a deep and profound of mystery in this chapter because, on first reading, we don’t know what is troubling Jekyll or what is making his mood swing so sharply. As far as we are concerned, Hyde has disappeared and therefore Jekyll possibly doesn’t need to worry about him. The shift from depression to “abject terror” is particularly perplexing. Why has he suddenly shut the window on his friends? What has happened to him to make him suddenly feel this way? The chapter, like the previous one, provokes many questions in the reader’s mind.